© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission.

Health Tests

for Goldendoodle & Labradoodle Breeding Dogs

The complete list of Suggested Health Tests by breed is here HIPS (retrievers & poodles & progeny) Hip Dysplasia is one of the most frequently occurring problems in large breed dogs.  HIP TESTING is paramount as the incidence of HD is much higher than other genetic problems.  The incidence of eye, cardiac, vWD, etc. has been comparatively rare in Doods. Find out why a breeder should be testing hips on their breeding dogs  -  •  HD Primer for the Puppy Buyer INCIDENCE OF HD (percentage of breed dysplastic according to the OFA) : Golden Retriever - 19.5% Poodle - 11.9% Labrador Retriever - 18.4% When asking a breeder about • Hip certification       Look for one of the of the following certifications:     • OFA certificate or prelim     • PennHIP certificate     • BVA (British Veterinary Association) certificate EYES (retrievers & poodles & progeny) Eye screening by a certified Canine Opthamologist is recommended before breeding Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers and Poodles.  Find out more about annual CERF eye testing  - •  CERF Eye testing When asking a breeder about • Eye certification       Look for one of the following certifications:    • CERF certificate    • clearance by a Canine Opthamologist    • prcdPRA testing - Progressive Retinal Atrophy -   Optigen  now provides an easy DNA test which will definitively show if a dog is affected or a carrier.  (not available for Standard Poodles or Goldendoodles) ELBOWS (retrievers & progeny) Elbow dysplasia is an inherited disease, and it is recommended to screen the elbows of both Golden Retriever and Labrador Retriever breeding dogs.  For more information, visit the OFA site - •   (for information about Elbow testing - click here) When asking a breeder about • Elbow certfication         Look for one of the following certifications:     • OFA certificate     • BVA (British Veterinary Association) certificate CARDIAC (australian labradoodles, golden retrievers & progeny) Australian Labradoodles and Golden Retrievers can inherit congential heart defects and breeding dogs should be examined annually by a Canine Cardiologist, or a Vet with access to Dopler echocardiography.  A dog with cardiac clearance either has no murmur, or an 'innocent' murmur.  Although these two hybrids are more prone to cardiac problems, some breeders test other breeding dogs as well. •   (for information about Cardiac testing - click here) When asking a breeder about • Cardiac Clearance  Look for one of the following certifications:    • OFA certificate    • heart clearance by Canine Cardiologist THYROID (golden retrievers, standard poodles & progeny) Standard Poodles are prone to hypothyroidism and breeding dogs should be tested for thyroid malfunction.   Testing is done by sending in a blood sample for diagnosis.  Although Standard Poodles are more prone to thyroid problems, some breeders test other breeding dogs as well. •   (for information about Thyroid testing - click here) When asking a breeder about • Thyroid Clearance Look for one of the following certifications:    • OFA certificate    • Dr. Dodds thyroid testing von Willebrand's Disease (poodles & progeny) Von Willebrand's is an inherited disorder that affects blood clotting.  All Poodle and Golden Retriever breeding dogs should be tested.  There is a DNA test available by VetGen which will identify some breeds as a Carrier, Affected or as Clear of the disease, although this method has not been independantly validated.  There is also blood test available through Cornell University. •   (for information about vWD  - click here) When asking a breeder about • Von Willebrand's Disease (vWD) Look for either :    • dog tested by VetGen and cleared    • dog tested by Cornell University and cleared    • dog cleared by parentage (both parents were tested and cleared) PATELLAR LUXATION (mini poodles & progeny) Small and miniature breed dogs are prone to patellar luxation (slipping of the kneecap). •   (for information about Patellar Luxation  - click here) When asking a breeder about • Patellar Luxation Look for the following certification:     • OFA certificate PRA DNA test (mini poodles & progeny) Progressive Retinal Atrophy are diseases which affect the retina of the eye.  It is an inherited group of diseases found in Toy & Miniature Poodles causing degrated eyesight and possible blindness.  A DNA test offered by OptiGen will determine Normal,  Probable Carriers, and Probably Affected dogs. •       (for information about PRA - click here) When asking a breeder about • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA test Look for one of the following tests:    • testing by HealthGene  (Goldendoodles.com breeders receive a 5% discount)    • testing by OptiGen ................................ The information contained on this site is in no way intended to replace that of proper veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is meant to provide resource, so that we can better understand canine health related issues. .
Goldendoodles.com
© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission

Health Tests

for Goldendoodle &

Labradoodle Breeding

Dogs

The complete list of Suggested Health Tests by breed is here HIPS (retrievers & poodles & progeny) Hip Dysplasia is one of the most frequently occurring problems in large breed dogs.  HIP TESTING is paramount as the incidence of HD is much higher than other genetic problems.  The incidence of eye, cardiac, vWD, etc. has been comparatively rare in Doods. Find out why a breeder should be testing hips on their breeding dogs  -  •  HD Primer for the Puppy Buyer INCIDENCE OF HD (percentage of breed dysplastic according to the OFA) : Golden Retriever - 19.5% Poodle - 11.9% Labrador Retriever - 18.4% When asking a breeder about • Hip certification       Look for one of the of the following certifications:     • OFA certificate or prelim     • PennHIP certificate     • BVA (British Veterinary Association) certificate EYES (retrievers & poodles & progeny) Eye screening by a certified Canine Opthamologist is recommended before breeding Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers and Poodles.  Find out more about annual CERF eye testing  - •  CERF Eye testing When asking a breeder about • Eye certification       Look for one of the following certifications:    • CERF certificate    • clearance by a Canine Opthamologist    • prcdPRA testing - Progressive Retinal Atrophy -   Optigen  now provides an easy DNA test which will definitively show if a dog is affected or a carrier.  (not available for Standard Poodles or Goldendoodles) ELBOWS (retrievers & progeny) Elbow dysplasia is an inherited disease, and it is recommended to screen the elbows of both Golden Retriever and Labrador Retriever breeding dogs.  For more information, visit the OFA site - •   (for information about Elbow testing - click here) When asking a breeder about • Elbow certfication         Look for one of the following certifications:     • OFA certificate     • BVA (British Veterinary Association) certificate CARDIAC (australian labradoodles, golden retrievers & progeny) Australian Labradoodles and Golden Retrievers can inherit congential heart defects and breeding dogs should be examined annually by a Canine Cardiologist, or a Vet with access to Dopler echocardiography.  A dog with cardiac clearance either has no murmur, or an 'innocent' murmur.  Although these two hybrids are more prone to cardiac problems, some breeders test other breeding dogs as well. •   (for information about Cardiac testing - click here) When asking a breeder about • Cardiac Clearance  Look for one of the following certifications:    • OFA certificate    • heart clearance by Canine Cardiologist THYROID (golden retrievers, standard poodles & progeny) Standard Poodles are prone to hypothyroidism and breeding dogs should be tested for thyroid malfunction.   Testing is done by sending in a blood sample for diagnosis.  Although Standard Poodles are more prone to thyroid problems, some breeders test other breeding dogs as well. •   (for information about Thyroid testing - click here) When asking a breeder about • Thyroid Clearance Look for one of the following certifications:    • OFA certificate    • Dr. Dodds thyroid testing von Willebrand's Disease (poodles & progeny) Von Willebrand's is an inherited disorder that affects blood clotting.  All Poodle and Golden Retriever breeding dogs should be tested.  There is a DNA test available by VetGen which will identify some breeds as a Carrier, Affected or as Clear of the disease, although this method has not been independantly validated.  There is also blood test available through Cornell University. •   (for information about vWD  - click here) When asking a breeder about • Von Willebrand's Disease (vWD) Look for either :    • dog tested by VetGen and cleared    • dog tested by Cornell University  and cleared    • dog cleared by parentage (both parents were tested and cleared) PATELLAR LUXATION (mini poodles & progeny) Small and miniature breed dogs are prone to patellar luxation (slipping of the kneecap). •   (for information about Patellar Luxation  - click here) When asking a breeder about • Patellar Luxation Look for the following certification:     • OFA certificate PRA DNA test (mini poodles & progeny) Progressive Retinal Atrophy are diseases which affect the retina of the eye.  It is an inherited group of diseases found in Toy & Miniature Poodles causing degrated eyesight and possible blindness.  A DNA test offered by OptiGen will determine Normal,  Probable Carriers, and Probably Affected dogs. •       (for information about PRA - click here) When asking a breeder about • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA test Look for one of the following tests:    • testing by HealthGene  (Goldendoodles.com breeders receive a 5% discount)    • testing by OptiGen ................................ The information contained on this site is in no way intended to replace that of proper veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is meant to provide resource, so that we can better understand canine health related issues. .